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Down-to-Earth Benefits of Space Exploration: Past, Present, Future
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Author and Affiliation:
Neumann, Benjamin(NASA, Washington, DC, United States)
Abstract: A ventricular device that helps a weakened heart keep pumping while awaiting a transplant. A rescue tool for extracting victims from dangerous situations such as car wrecks. A video analysis tool used to investigate the bombing at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. A sound-differentiation tool for safer air traffic control. A refrigerator that run without electricity or batteries. These are just a few of the spin-offs of NASA technology that have benefited society in recent years. Now, as NASA sets its vision on space exploration, particularly of the moon and Mars, even more benefits to society are possible. This expansion of societal benefits is tied to a new emphasis on technology infusion or spin-in. NASA is seeking partners with industry, universities, and other government laboratories to help the Agency address its specific space exploration needs in five areas: (1) advanced studies, concepts, and tools; (2) advanced materials; (3) communications, computing, electronics, and imaging; (4) software, intelligent systems, and modeling; and (5) power, propulsion, and chemical systems. These spin-in partnerships will offer benefits to U.S. economic development as well as new products for the global market. As a complement to these spin-in benefits, NASA also is examining the possible future spin-outs of the innovations related to its new space exploration mission. A matrix that charts NASA's needs against various business sectors is being developed to fully understand the implications for society and industry of spin-in and spin-out. This matrix already has been used to help guide NASA s efforts to secure spin-in partnerships. This paper presents examples of NASA spin-offs, discusses NASA s present spin-in/spin-out projects for pursuing partnerships, and considers some of the future societal benefits to be reaped from these partnerships. This paper will complement the proposed paper by Frank Schowengerdt on the Innovative Partnerships Program structure and how to work with the PP.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2005
Document ID:
20050245187
(Acquired Dec 29, 2005)
Subject Category: SPACE SCIENCES (GENERAL)
Document Type: Preprint
Meeting Information: 56th International Astronautical Congress "Space for Inspiration of Humankind"; 15-21 Oct. 2005; Fukuoka; Japan
Financial Sponsor: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Organization Source: NASA; Washington, DC, United States
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Description: 48p; In English; Original contains black and white illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: SPACE EXPLORATION; SOFTWARE ENGINEERING; PROPULSION SYSTEM CONFIGURATIONS; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; IMAGING TECHNIQUES; UNIVERSITIES; RESCUE OPERATIONS; INDUSTRIES
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