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Compact Autonomous Hemispheric Vision System
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External Online Source: http://www.techbriefs.com/component/content/article/15269
Author and Affiliation:
Pingree, Paula J.(California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
Cunningham, Thomas J.(California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
Werne, Thomas A.(California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
Eastwood, Michael L.(California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
Walch, Marc J.(California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
Staehle, Robert L.(California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Abstract: Solar System Exploration camera implementations to date have involved either single cameras with wide field-of-view (FOV) and consequently coarser spatial resolution, cameras on a movable mast, or single cameras necessitating rotation of the host vehicle to afford visibility outside a relatively narrow FOV. These cameras require detailed commanding from the ground or separate onboard computers to operate properly, and are incapable of making decisions based on image content that control pointing and downlink strategy. For color, a filter wheel having selectable positions was often added, which added moving parts, size, mass, power, and reduced reliability. A system was developed based on a general-purpose miniature visible-light camera using advanced CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) imager technology. The baseline camera has a 92 FOV and six cameras are arranged in an angled-up carousel fashion, with FOV overlaps such that the system has a 360 FOV (azimuth). A seventh camera, also with a FOV of 92 , is installed normal to the plane of the other 6 cameras giving the system a > 90 FOV in elevation and completing the hemispheric vision system. A central unit houses the common electronics box (CEB) controlling the system (power conversion, data processing, memory, and control software). Stereo is achieved by adding a second system on a baseline, and color is achieved by stacking two more systems (for a total of three, each system equipped with its own filter.) Two connectors on the bottom of the CEB provide a connection to a carrier (rover, spacecraft, balloon, etc.) for telemetry, commands, and power. This system has no moving parts. The system's onboard software (SW) supports autonomous operations such as pattern recognition and tracking.
Publication Date: Dec 01, 2012
Document ID:
20130009407
(Acquired Feb 12, 2013)
Subject Category: MAN/SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE SUPPORT
Report/Patent Number: NPO-48172
Document Type: NASA Tech Brief
Publication Information: NASA Tech Briefs, December 2012; 18-19; (SEE 20130009376)
Financial Sponsor: Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech.; Pasadena, CA, United States
Organization Source: California Inst. of Tech.; Pasadena, CA, United States
Description: 2p; In English; Original contains color illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Distribution as joint owner in the copyright
NASA Terms: AUTONOMY; CAMERAS; FIELD OF VIEW; LIGHT (VISIBLE RADIATION); MINIATURIZATION; VOID RATIO; HEMISPHERE CYLINDER BODIES; CMOS; AIRBORNE/SPACEBORNE COMPUTERS; FIELD-PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAYS; ALGORITHMS
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