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First X-Ray Diffraction Results from Mars Science Laboratory: Mineralogy of Rocknest Aeolian Bedform at Gale Crater
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Author and Affiliation:
Bish, D. L.(Indiana Univ., Dept. of Geological Sciences, Bloomington, IN, United States);
Blake, D. F.(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States);
Vaniman, D. T.(Planetary Science Inst., Tucson, AZ, United States);
Chipera, S. J.(Chesapeake Energy Corp., Oklahoma City, OK, United States);
Sarrazin, P.(inXitu, Mountain View, CA, United States);
Morris, R. V.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States);
Ming, D. W.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States);
Treiman, A. H.(Lunar and Planetary Inst., Houston, TX, United States);
Downs, R. T.(Arizona Univ., AZ, United States);
Morrison, S. M.(Arizona Univ., AZ, United States);
Yen, A. S.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
Achilles, C. N.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States);
Morookian, J. M.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
Farmer, J. D.(Arizona State Univ., AZ, United States);
Crisp, J. A.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
Rampe, E. B.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States);
Stolper, E. M.(California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
DesMarais, D. J.(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States);
Spanovich, N.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
Anderson, R. C.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Abstract: Numerous orbital and landed observations of the martian surface suggest a reasonably uniform martian soil composition, likely as a result of global aeolian mixing [1, 2]. Chemical data for martian soils are abundant [e.g., 2, 3], and phase information has been provided by lander thermal emission and Moessbauer spectroscopic measurements [3, 4, 5, 6]. However, until now no X-ray diffraction (XRD) data were available for martian soil nor has XRD ever been used on another body apart from Earth. XRD is generally considered the most definitive method for determining the crystalline phases in solid samples, and it is the method of choice for determining mineralogy. CheMin s first XRD analysis on Mars coincided with the 100th anniversary of the discovery of X-ray diffraction by von Laue. Curiosity delivered scooped samples of loose, unconsolidated material ("soil") acquired from an aeolian bedform at the Rocknest locality to instruments in the body of the rover (the laboratory). Imaging shows that the soil has a range of particle sizes, of 1-2 mm and smaller, presumably representing contributions from global, regional, and local sources.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2013
Document ID:
20130009935
(Acquired Feb 22, 2013)
Subject Category: GEOPHYSICS
Report/Patent Number: JSC-CN-27878
Document Type: Conference Paper
Meeting Information: Lunar and Planetary Science Conference; 18-22 Mar. 2013; The Woodlands, TX; United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Organization Source: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Description: 3p; In English; Original contains color illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Distribution as joint owner in the copyright
NASA Terms: CRATERS; CRYSTALLINITY; MARS SURFACE; MINERALOGY; PLANETARY GEOLOGY; SELECTION; SPECTROSCOPY; THERMAL EMISSION; WIND (METEOROLOGY); X RAY DIFFRACTION
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