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Detection of Evolved Carbon Dioxide in the Rocknest Eolian Bedform by the Sample Analysis at Mars(SAM) Instrument at the Mars Curiosity Landing Site
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Author and Affiliation:
Sutter, B.(Jacobs Technologies Engineering Science Contract Group, Houston, TX, United States);
Archer, D.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States);
McAdam, A.(Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico);
Franz, H.(Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico);
Ming, D. W.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States);
Eigenbrode, J. L.(Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico);
Glavin, D. P.(Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico);
Mahaffy, P.(Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico);
Stern, J.(Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico);
Navarro-Gonzalez, R.(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Abstract: The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument detected four releases of carbon dioxide (CO2) that ranged from 100 to 700 C from the Rocknest eolian bedform material (Fig. 1). Candidate sources of CO2 include adsorbed CO2, carbonate(s), combusted organics that are either derived from terrestrial contamination and/or of martian origin, occluded or trapped CO2, and other sources that have yet to be determined. The Phoenix Lander s Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) detected two CO2 releases (400-600, 700-840 C) [1,2]. The low temperature release was attributed to Fe- and/or Mg carbonates [1,2], per-chlorate interactions with carbonates [3], nanophase carbonates [4] and/or combusted organics [1]. The high temperature CO2 release was attributed to a calcium bearing carbonate [1,2]. No evidence of a high temperature CO2 release similar to the Phoenix material was detected in the Rocknest materials by SAM. The objectives of this work are to evaluate the temperature and total contribution of each Rocknest CO2 release and their possible sources. Four CO2 releases from the Rocknest material were detected by SAM. Potential sources of CO2 are adsorbed CO2, (peak 1) and Fe/Mg carbonates (peak 4). Only a fraction of peaks 2 and 3 (0.01 C wt.%) may be partially attributed to combustion of organic contamination. Meteoritic organics mixed in the Rocknest bedform could be present, but the peak 2 and 3 C concentration (approx.0.21 C wt. %) is likely too high to be attributed solely to meteoritic organic C. Other inorganic sources of C such as interactions of perchlorates and carbonates and sources yet to be identified will be evaluated to account for CO2 released from the thermal decomposition of Rocknest material.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2013
Document ID:
20130009940
(Acquired Feb 22, 2013)
Subject Category: LUNAR AND PLANETARY SCIENCE AND EXPLORATION
Report/Patent Number: JSC-CN-27831
Document Type: Extended Abstract
Meeting Information: Lunar and Planetary Science Conference; 18-22 Mar. 2013; The Woodlands, TX; United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Organization Source: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Description: 2p; In English; Original contains color illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Distribution as joint owner in the copyright
NASA Terms: CALCIUM CARBONATES; CARBON DIOXIDE; THERMAL DECOMPOSITION; MARS LANDING SITES; PERCHLORATES; GAS DETECTORS; HIGH TEMPERATURE; MARS (PLANET); CHLORATES; CONTAMINATION
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