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Control of NASA's Space Launch SystemThe flight control system for the NASA Space Launch System (SLS) employs a control architecture that evolved from Saturn, Shuttle & Ares I-X while also incorporating modern enhancements. This control system, baselined for the first unmanned launch, has been verified and successfully flight-tested on the Ares I-X rocket and an F/A-18 aircraft. The development of the launch vehicle itself came on the heels of the Space Shuttle retirement in 2011, and will deliver more payload to orbit and produce more thrust than any other vehicle, past or present, opening the way to new frontiers of space exploration as it carries the Orion crew vehicle, equipment, and experiments into new territories. The initial 70 metric ton vehicle consists of four RS-25 core stage engines from the Space Shuttle inventory, two 5- segment solid rocket boosters which are advanced versions of the Space Shuttle boosters, and a core stage that resembles the External Tank and carries the liquid propellant while also serving as the vehicle's structural backbone. Just above SLS' core stage is the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS), based upon the payload motor used by the Delta IV Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV).
Document ID
20140010097
Document Type
Other
Authors
VanZwieten, Tannen S. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville, AL, United States)
Date Acquired
July 24, 2014
Publication Date
January 1, 2014
Subject Category
Launch Vehicles and Launch Operations
Spacecraft Propulsion and Power
Report/Patent Number
M14-3414
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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