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Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed MissionThis paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR&D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion spacecraft. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a three-dimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build-time instead of at design-time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal non-recurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe the current design status and the considerations and technologies involved in developing this docking mechanism.
Document ID
20150019634
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Hinkel, Heather
(NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Strube, Matthew
(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Zipay, John J.
(NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Cryan, Scott
(NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Date Acquired
October 22, 2015
Publication Date
March 5, 2016
Subject Category
Spacecraft Design, Testing And Performance
Report/Patent Number
JSC-CN-34580
Meeting Information
Meeting: 2016 IEEE Aerospace Conference
Location: Big Sky, MT
Country: United States
Start Date: March 5, 2016
End Date: March 12, 2016
Sponsors: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, American Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, PHM Society
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.
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