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Mount St. Helens related aerosol properties from solar extinction measurementsA network of solar radiometers, operated on the North American Continent for an average of 2 years before the first major eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, continues to collect direct solar data through the eruptive phase of this volcano. The radiometers collect spectral data through 12 interference filters spanning the sensitivity of the photodiode used as detector. The data are collected every 5 minutes in seven filters and every 15 minutes in five additional filters. A variant of the classical Langley method has been used to measure the optical depth of the aerosols as a function of wavelength. The network, which is the nearest station, is located some 180 kilometers east of the volcano, well within range of noticeable effects during much of the minor as well as major activity. The wavelength dependence of the aerosol-optical depth before and after the 22 July 1980 major eruption, which was well characterized because of favorable meteorological conditions is discussed.
Document ID
19830003288
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Michalsky, J. J. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs. Richland, WA, United States)
Kleckner, E. W. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs. Richland, WA, United States)
Stokes, G. M. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs. Richland, WA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 11, 2013
Publication Date
October 1, 1982
Publication Information
Publication: NASA. Langley Research Center Atmospheric Effects and Potential Climatic Impact of the 1980 Eruptions of Mt. St. Helens
Subject Category
ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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