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Hypersonic engine component experiments in high heat flux, supersonic flow environmentA major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Even though progress has been made in the computational understanding of fluid dynamics and the physics/chemistry of high speed flight, there is also a need for experimental facilities capable of providing a high heat flux environment for testing component concepts and verifying/calibrating these analyses. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to fulfill this need. This 'Hot Gas Facility' is capable of providing heat fluxes up to 450 w/sq cm on flat surfaces and up to 5,000 w/sq cm at the leading edge stagnation point of a strut in a supersonic flow stream. Gas temperatures up to 3050 K can also be attained. Two recent experimental programs conducted in this facility are discussed. The objective of the first experiment is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Macrophotographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight. The objective of the second experiment is to assess the capability of cooling a porous surface exposed to a high temperature, high velocity flow environment and to provide a heat transfer data base for a design procedure. Experimental results from transpiration cooled surfaces in a supersonic flow environment are presented.
Document ID
19930022671
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Gladden, Herbert J.
(NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH, United States)
Melis, Matthew E.
(NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH, United States)
Date Acquired
September 6, 2013
Publication Date
July 1, 1993
Subject Category
Fluid Mechanics And Heat Transfer
Report/Patent Number
NASA-TM-106273
E-8002
NAS 1.15:106273
Meeting Information
International Symposium on Optical Applied Science and Engineering(San Diego, CA)
Accession Number
93N31860
Funding Number(s)
PROJECT: RTOP 505-62-52
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.
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