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The 1990 vertical distribution of two important halons (F-12B1 and F-13B1) in the tropicsThe first vertical profiles of F-12B1 and F-13B1 had been obtained in the tropical troposphere and stratosphere by us in 1987. The measurement of these substances responsible for almost the entire anthropogenic contribution to the stratospheric BrO(x) budget is important in the tropics, as tropical upwelling provides their injection along with that of other pollutants, into the stratosphere. To ascertain the trends of these distributions and foster the data, the 1987 experiment was repeated in April 1990. Like 1987, the MPAE cryogenic whole air sampler was launched on a balloon from Hyderabad, India (17.5 deg N), and 14 samples were collected between 10 and 35 km altitude. The results obtained by means of GC and GC-MS analyses showed that the atmospheric abundance of both F-12B1 and F-13B1 is increasing at a fast rate, respectively by about 15 percent and 10 percent per year. From 1987 to 1990, F-12B1 and F-13B1 tropospheric mixing ratios have been growing from 1.2 and 1.3 ppt to 1.8 and 1.7 ppt, respectively. The vertical profiles will be discussed.
Document ID
19950004687
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Singh, O. N. (Banaras Hindu Univ. Varanasi, India)
Borchers, R. (Banaras Hindu Univ. Varanasi, India)
Lal, Shyam (Banaras Hindu Univ. Varanasi, India)
Subbarya, B. H. (Banaras Hindu Univ. Varanasi, India)
Krueger, Bernd C. (Banaras Hindu Univ. Varanasi, India)
Fabian, Peter (Banaras Hindu Univ. Varanasi, India)
Date Acquired
September 6, 2013
Publication Date
April 1, 1994
Publication Information
Publication: NASA. Goddard Space Flight Center, Ozone in the Troposphere and Stratosphere, Part 2
Subject Category
ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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