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Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE)Results are reported of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) aboard the USML-1 (first United States Microgravity Laboratory) Spacelab which was launched on June 25, 1992. In the experiment 10 cSt silicone oil was placed in an open circular container which was 10 cm wide by 5 cm deep. The fluid was heated either by a cylindrical heater (1.11 cm dia.) located along the container centerline or by a CO2 laser beam to induce thermocapillary flow. The flow field was studied by flow visualization. Several thermistor probes were placed in the fluid to measure the temperature distribution. The temperature distribution along the liquid free surface was measured by an infrared imager. Tests were conducted over a range of heating powers, laser beam diameters, and free surface shapes. In conjunction with the experiments an extensive numerical modeling of the flow was conducted. In this paper some results of the velocity and temperature measurements with flat and curved free surfaces are presented and they are shown to agree well with the numerical predictions.
Document ID
19950007803
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Ostrach, Simon (Case Western Reserve Univ. Cleveland, OH., United States)
Kamotani, Y. (Case Western Reserve Univ. Cleveland, OH., United States)
Pline, A. (NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH, United States)
Date Acquired
September 6, 2013
Publication Date
May 1, 1994
Publication Information
Publication: NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center, Joint Launch + One Year Science Review of USML-1 and USMP-1 with the Microgravity Measurement Group
Subject Category
MATERIALS PROCESSING
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: NAS3-25973
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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