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A Low Earth Orbit satellite marine communication system demonstrationAn application of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite communications technology was investigated during a joint Canadian/American scientific expedition to the north pole in the summer of 1994. The Canadian ice breaker involved, was equipped with a store-and-forward LEO satellite terminal which was linked to a ground station in St. John's, Newfoundland, via the near-polar-orbiting satellite, HealthSat-l. The objective was to evaluate the performance of such a system while providing an alternate means of communications in the far north. The system performed well, given its inherent limitations. All 151 attempts to send data files to the ship were successful. Only two (2) of the 35 attempts to send files from the ship were unsuccessful. The files ranged in size from 0.1 to 60 Kbytes. In the high arctic, above 80 deg north, this system often provided the only practical means of data communications. This experiment demonstrated the potential of such a system for not-real-time communications with remote and/or mobile stations, and highlighted the many issues involved. This paper describes the project objectives, system configuration and experimental procedure used, related technical issues, trial results, future work, and conclusions.
Document ID
19960022482
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Elms, T. Keith (Canadian Centre for Marine Communications Saint John's, Newfoundland Canada)
Butt, Kenneth A. (Canadian Centre for Marine Communications Saint John's, Newfoundland Canada)
Asmus, Ken W. (Environment Canada Ottawa, Ontario Canada)
Date Acquired
August 17, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1995
Publication Information
Publication: Proceedings of the Fourth International Mobile Satellite Conference (IMSC 1995)
Subject Category
Communications and Radar
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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IDRelationTitle19960022452Analytic PrimaryProceedings of the Fourth International Mobile Satellite Conference (IMSC 1995)
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