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bone proteoglycan changes during skeletal unloadingSkeletal adaptability to mechanical loads is well known since the last century. Disuse osteopenia due to the microgravity environment is one of the major concerns for space travelers. Several studies have indicated that a retardation of the mineralization process and a delay in matrix maturation occur during the space flight. Mineralizing fibrillar type I collagen possesses distinct cross-linking chemistries and their dynamic changes during mineralization correlate well with its function as a mineral organizer. Our previous studies suggested that a certain group of matrix proteoglycans in bone play an inhibitory role in the mineralization process through their interaction with collagen. Based on these studies, we hypothesized that the altered mineralization during spaceflight is due in part to changes in matrix components secreted by cells in response to microgravity. In this study, we employed hindlimb elevation (tail suspension) rat model to study the effects of skeletal unloading on matrix proteoglycans in bone.
Document ID
20000020540
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Yamauchi, M.
(North Carolina Univ. Chapel Hill, NC United States)
Uzawa, K.
(North Carolina Univ. Chapel Hill, NC United States)
Pornprasertsuk, S.
(North Carolina Univ. Chapel Hill, NC United States)
Arnaud, S.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA United States)
Grindeland, R.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA United States)
Grzesik, W.
(North Carolina Univ. Chapel Hill, NC United States)
Date Acquired
August 19, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1999
Publication Information
Publication: Proceedings of the First Biennial Space Biomedical Investigators' Workshop
Subject Category
Aerospace Medicine
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: NAG2-1188
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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IDRelationTitle20000020485Analytic PrimaryProceedings of the First Biennial Space Biomedical Investigators' Workshop
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