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the effects of long-duration spaceflight on postflight terrestrial locomotionLocomotion is a complex task requiring the coordinated integration of multiple sensorimotor subsystems. This coordination is exemplified by the precise control of segmental kinematics that allows smooth progression of movement in the face of changing environmental constraints. Exposure to the microgravity environment encountered during space flight induces adaptive modification in the central processing of sensory input to produce motor responses appropriate for the prevailing environment. This inflight adaptive change in sensorimotor function is inappropriate for movement control in 1-g and leads to postflight disturbances in terrestrial locomotor function. We have previously explored the effects of short-duration (7-16 days) space flight on the control of locomotion. The goal of the present set of studies was to investigate the effects of long-duration spaceflight (3-6 months) on the control of locomotion with particular emphasis on understanding how the multiple interacting systems are adaptively modified by prolonged microgravity exposure.
Document ID
20000020607
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Bloomberg, J. J.
(NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX United States)
Mulavara, A. P.
(Wyle Life Sciences, Inc. Houston, TX United States)
McDonald, P. V.
(Wyle Life Sciences, Inc. Houston, TX United States)
Layne, C. S.
(Houston Univ. TX United States)
Merkle, L. A.
(NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX United States)
Cohen, H. S.
(Baylor Coll. of Medicine Houston, TX United States)
Kozlovskaya, I. B.
(Institute for Biomedical Problems Moscow Russia)
Date Acquired
August 19, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1999
Publication Information
Publication: Proceedings of the First Biennial Space Biomedical Investigators' Workshop
Subject Category
Aerospace Medicine
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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IDRelationTitle20000020485Analytic PrimaryProceedings of the First Biennial Space Biomedical Investigators' Workshop
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