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sleep and circadian rhythms in four orbiting astronautsINTRODUCTION The study of human sleep and circadian rhythms in space has both operational and scientific significance. Operationally, U.S. Spaceflight is moving away from brief missions with durations of less than one week. Most space shuttle missions now last two weeks or more, and future plans involving space stations, lunar bases and interplanetary missions all presume that people will be living away from the gravity and time cues of earth for months at a time. Thus, missions are moving away from situations where astronauts can "tough it out" for comparatively brief durations, to situations where sleep and circadian disruptions are likely to become chronic, and thus resistant to short term pharmacological or behavioral manipulations. As well as the operational significance, there is a strong theoretical imperative for studying the sleep and circadian rhythms of people who are removed from the gravity and time cues of earth. Like other animals, in humans, the Circadian Timekeeping System (CTS) is entrained to the correct period (24h) and temporal orientation by various time cues ("zeitgebers"), the most powerful of which is the alternation of daylight and darkness. In leaving Earth, astronauts are removing themselves from the prime zeitgeber of their circadian system -- the 24h alternation of daylight and darkness.
Document ID
20000020664
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Monk, Timothy H.
(Pittsburgh Univ. Pittsburgh, PA United States)
Buysse, Daniel J.
(Pittsburgh Univ. Pittsburgh, PA United States)
Billy, Bart D.
(Pittsburgh Univ. Pittsburgh, PA United States)
Kennedy, Kathy S.
(Pittsburgh Univ. Pittsburgh, PA United States)
Willrich, Linda M.
(Pittsburgh Univ. Pittsburgh, PA United States)
Date Acquired
August 19, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1999
Publication Information
Publication: Proceedings of the First Biennial Space Biomedical Investigators' Workshop
Subject Category
Aerospace Medicine
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: NIH-MH-01235
CONTRACT_GRANT: NAS9-19407
CONTRACT_GRANT: NAS9-18404
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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IDRelationTitle20000020485Analytic PrimaryProceedings of the First Biennial Space Biomedical Investigators' Workshop
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