NASA Logo

NTRS

NTRS - NASA Technical Reports Server

Back to Results
Computer Graphic Design Using Auto-CAD and Plug Nozzle ResearchThe purpose of creating computer generated images varies widely. They can be use for computational fluid dynamics (CFD), or as a blueprint for designing parts. The schematic that I will be working on the summer will be used to create nozzles that are a part of a larger system. At this phase in the project, the nozzles needed for the systems have been fabricated. One part of my mission is to create both three dimensional and two dimensional models on Auto-CAD 2002 of the nozzles. The research on plug nozzles will allow me to have a better understanding of how they assist in the thrust need for a missile to take off. NASA and the United States military are working together to develop a new design concept. On most missiles a convergent-divergent nozzle is used to create thrust. However, the two are looking into different concepts for the nozzle. The standard convergent-divergent nozzle forces a mixture of combustible fluids and air through a smaller area in comparison to where the combination was mixed. Once it passes through the smaller area known as A8 it comes out the end of the nozzle which is larger the first or area A9. This creates enough thrust for the mechanism whether it is an F-18 fighter jet or a missile. The A9 section of the convergent-divergent nozzle has a mechanism that controls how large A9 can be. This is needed because the pressure of the air coming out nozzle must be equal to that of the ambient pressure other wise there will be a loss of performance in the machine. The plug nozzle however does not need to have an A9 that can vary. When the air flow comes out it can automatically sense what the ambient pressure is and will adjust accordingly. The objective of this design is to create a plug nozzle that is not as complicated mechanically as it counterpart the convergent-divergent nozzle.
Document ID
20050186802
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Rogers, Rayna C. (Dayton Univ. OH, United States)
Date Acquired
August 23, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 2004
Publication Information
Publication: Research Symposium I
Subject Category
Computer Programming and Software
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

Related Records

IDRelationTitle20050186794Analytic PrimaryResearch Symposium I