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Establishing a Near Term Lunar Farside Gravity Model via Inexpensive Add-on Navigation PayloadThe Space Communications and Navigation, Constellation Integration Project (SCIP) is tasked with defining, developing, deploying and operating an evolving multi-decade communications and navigation (C/N) infrastructure including services and subsystems that will support both robotic and human exploration activities at the Moon. This paper discusses an early far side gravitational mapping service and related telecom subsystem that uses an existing spacecraft (WIND) and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to collect data that would address several needs of the SCIP. An important aspect of such an endeavor is to vastly improve the current lunar gravity model while demonstrating the navigation and stationkeeping of a relay spacecraft. We describe a gravity data acquisition activity and the trajectory design of the relay orbit in an Earth-Moon L2 co-linear libration orbit. Several phases of the transfer from an Earth-Sun to the Earth-Moon region are discussed along with transfers within the Earth-Moon system. We describe a proposed, but not integrated, add-on to LRO scheduled to be launched in October of 2008. LRO provided a real host spacecraft against which we designed the science payload and mission activities. From a strategic standpoint, LRO was a very exciting first flight opportunity for gravity science data collection. Gravity Science data collection requires the use of one or more low altitude lunar polar orbiters. Variations in the lunar gravity field will cause measurable variations in the orbit of a low altitude lunar orbiter. The primary means to capture these induced motions is to monitor the Doppler shift of a radio signal to or from the low altitude spacecraft, given that the signal is referenced to a stable frequency reference. For the lunar far side, a secondary orbiting radio signal platform is required. We provide an in-depth look at link margins, trajectory design, and hardware implications. Our approach posed minimum risk to a host mission while maintaining a very low implementation and operations cost.
Document ID
20080012641
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Folta, David (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Mesarch, Michael (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Miller, Ronald (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Bell, David (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Jedrey, Tom (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Butman, Stanley (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Asmar, Sami (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 24, 2013
Publication Date
September 24, 2007
Publication Information
Publication: Proceedings of the 20th International Symposium on Space Flight Dynamics
Subject Category
Spacecraft Design, Testing and Performance
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Public Use Permitted.

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IDRelationTitle20080012629Analytic PrimaryProceedings of the 20th International Symposium on Space Flight Dynamics