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Development and Testing of a Vehicle Management System for Autonomous Spacecraft Habitat OperationsAs the increased distance between Earth-based mission control and the spacecraft results in increasing communication delays, small crews cannot take on all functions performed by ground today, and so vehicles must be more automated to reduce the crew workload for such missions. In addition, both near-term and future missions will feature significant periods when crew is not present, meaning the vehicles will need to operate themselves autonomously. NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program pioneers new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Under this program, NASA has developed and demonstrated multiple technologies to enable the autonomous operation of a dormant space habitat. These technologies included a fault-tolerant avionics architecture, novel spacecraft power system and power system controller, and autonomy software to control the habitat. The demonstration involved simulation of the habitat and multiple spacecraft sub-systems (power storage and distribution, avionics, and air-side life-support) during a multi-day test at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The foundation of the demonstration was ‘quiescent operations' of a habitat during a 55 minute eclipse period. For this demonstration, the spacecraft power distribution system and air-side life support system were simulated at a high level of fidelity; additional systems were managed, but with lower fidelity operational constraints and system behavior. Operational constraints for real and simulated loads were developed by analyzing on-orbit hardware and evaluating future Exploration capable technology. A total of 13 real and simulated loads were used during the test. Eight scenarios including both nominal and off-nominal conditions were performed. Over the course of the test, every application performed its desired functions successfully during the simulated tests. The results will inform both future tests, as well as provide insight to NASA's domestic and international partners, as they construct the next generation of space habitats to be used on beyond-Earth missions.
Document ID
20180007238
Document Type
Conference Paper
External Source(s)
Authors
Aaseng, G.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Frank, J.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Iatauro, M.
(SGT, Inc. Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Knight, C.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Levinson, R.
(SGT, Inc. Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Ossenfort, J.
(SGT, Inc. Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Scott, M.
(SGT, Inc. Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Sweet, A.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Csank, J.
(NASA Glenn Research Center Cleveland, OH, United States)
Soeder, J.
(NASA Glenn Research Center Cleveland, OH, United States)
Carrejo, D.
(NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Loveless, A.
(NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Ngo, T.
(NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Greenwood, Z.
(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville, AL, United States)
Date Acquired
October 30, 2018
Publication Date
September 17, 2018
Subject Category
Cybernetics, Artificial Intelligence And Robotics
Lunar And Planetary Science And Exploration
Report/Patent Number
ARC-E-DAA-TN60381
Meeting Information
Meeting: AIAA Space Forum
Location: Orlando, FL
Country: United States
Start Date: September 17, 2018
End Date: September 19, 2018
Sponsors: American Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: NNA14AA60C
WBS: WBS 089407.01.21
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Public Use Permitted.
Keywords
Autonomous Systems and Operations
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