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Record Details

Record 33 of 2211
Airway structure and alveolar emptying in the lungs of sea lions and dogs.
External Online Source: doi:10.1016/0034-5687(71)90029-6
Author and Affiliation:
Denison, D. M.
Warrell, D. A.
West, J. B.(California, University, La Jolla, Calif., United States)
Abstract: Investigation of the effects of various cycles of compression and decompression on the alveolar volumes of the excised lungs of sea lions and dogs. The results obtained include the finding that, in comparison to dog lungs, sea lion lungs empty more completely on mild compression and much more completely on severe compression. These findings support Scholander's (1940) hypothesis that some marine mammals are protected from decompression sickness by cartilaginous reinforcement of the small airways which permits alveolar emptying during a dive, so isolating compressed gas from pulmonary capillary blood.
Publication Date: Dec 01, 1971
Document ID:
19720037520
(Acquired Dec 04, 1995)
Accession Number: 72A21186
Subject Category: BIOSCIENCES
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Respiration Physiology; 13; Dec. 197
Publisher Information: Netherlands
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NGL-05-009-109
Financial Sponsor: NASA; United States
Description: 8p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: ALVEOLAR AIR; DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS; LUNGS; PRESSURE EFFECTS; MAMMALS; ROOM TEMPERATURE; STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
Imprint And Other Notes: Respiration Physiology, vol. 13, Dec. 1971, p. 253-260.
Miscellaneous Notes: p. 253-260
Availability Source: Other Sources
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