NASA Logo

NTRS

NTRS - NASA Technical Reports Server

Back to Results
Symbiosis in cell evolution: Life and its environment on the early earthThe book treats cell evolution from the viewpoint of the serial endosymbiosis theory of the origin of organelles. Following a brief outline of the symbiotic theory, which holds that eukaryotes evolved by the association of free-living bacteria with a host prokaryote, the diversity of life is considered, and five kingdoms of organisms are distinguished: the prokaryotic Monera and the eukaryotic Protoctista, Animalia, Fungi and Plantae. Symbiotic and traditional direct filiation theories of cell evolution are compared. Recent observations of cell structure and biochemistry are reviewed in relation to early cell evolution, with attention given to the geological context for the origin of eukaryotic cells, the origin of major bacterial anaerobic pathways, the relationship between aerobic metabolism and atmospheric oxygen, criteria for distinguishing symbiotic organelles from those that originated by differentiation, and the major classes of eukaryotic organelles: mitochondria, cilia, microtubules, the mitotic and meiotic apparatuses, and pastids. Cell evolution during the Phanerozoic is also discussed with emphasis on the effects of life on the biosphere
Document ID
19820044578
Document Type
Book
Authors
Margulis, L. (Boston University Boston, MA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 10, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1981
Subject Category
LIFE SCIENCES (GENERAL)
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: NGR-22-004-025
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other