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The application of cryogenics to high Reynolds number testing in wind tunnels. I - Evolution, theory, and advantagesDuring the time which has passed since the construction of the first wind tunnel in 1870, wind tunnels have been developed to a high degree of sophistication. However, their development has consistently failed to keep pace with the demands placed on them. One of the more serious problems to be found with existing transonic wind tunnels is their inability to test subscale aircraft models at Reynolds numbers sufficiently near full-scale values to ensure the validity of using the wind tunnel data to predict flight characteristics. The Reynolds number capability of a wind tunnel may be increased by a number of different approaches. However, the best solution in terms of model, balance, and model support loads, as well as in terms of capital and operating cost appears to be related to the reduction of the temperature of the test gas to cryogenic temperatures. The present paper has the objective to review the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel concept and to describe its more important advantages.
Document ID
19850059177
Document Type
Reprint (Version printed in journal)
Authors
Kilgore, R. A. (NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA, United States)
Dress, D. A. (NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 12, 2013
Publication Date
August 1, 1984
Publication Information
Publication: Cryogenics
ISSN: 0011-2275
Subject Category
RESEARCH AND SUPPORT FACILITIES (AIR)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other