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Record 42 of 479
Absolute electron density measurements in the equatorial ionosphere
External Online Source: doi:10.1016/0021-9169(85)90054-6
Author and Affiliation:
Baker, K. D.(Utah State Univ., Logan, UT, United States)
Howlett, L. C.(Utah State Univ., Logan, UT, United States)
Rao, N. B.(Utah State Univ., Logan, UT, United States)
Ulwick, J. C.(Utah State University, of Agriculture and Applied Science, Logan, United States)
Labelle, J.(Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States)
et al.
Abstract: Accurate measurement of the electron density profile and its variations is crucial to further progress in understanding the physics of the disturbed equatorial ionosphere. To accomplish this, a plasma frequency probe was included in the payload complement of two rockets flown during the Condor rocket campaign conducted from Peru in March 1983. This paper presents density profiles of the disturbed equatorial ionosphere from a night-time flight in which spread-F conditions were present and from a day-time flight during strong electrojet conditions. Results from both flights are in excellent agreement with simultaneous radar data in that the regions of highly disturbed plasma coincide with the radar signatures. The spread-F rocket penetrated a topside depletion during both the upleg and downleg. The electrojet measurements showed a profile peaking at 1.3 x 10 to the 5th per cu cm at 106 km, with large scale fluctuations having amplitudes of roughly 10 percent seen only in the upward gradient in electron density. This is in agreement with plasma instability theory. It is further shown that simultaneous measurements by fixed-bias Langmuir probes, when normalized at a single point to the altitude profile of electron density, are inadequate to correctly parameterize the observed enhancements and depletions.
Publication Date: Oct 01, 1985
Document ID:
19860034342
(Acquired Nov 28, 1995)
Accession Number: 86A19080
Subject Category: GEOPHYSICS
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics (ISSN 0021-9169); 47; 781-789
Publisher Information: United Kingdom
Contract/Grant/Task Num: N00014-81-K-0018; NAG5-603; NSG-6020
Financial Sponsor: NASA; United States
Organization Source: Utah State Univ.; Logan, UT, United States
Cornell Univ.; Ithaca, NY, United States
Description: 9p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: EQUATORIAL ATMOSPHERE; IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY; ROCKET SOUNDING; DAYTIME; ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES; EQUATORIAL ELECTROJET; IONOSPHERIC DISTURBANCES; NIGHT SKY; SPACE PLASMAS; SPREAD F; VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION
Imprint And Other Notes: (IUGG, IAGA, USAF, et al., International Symposium on Equatorial Aeronomy, 7th, Hong Kong, Mar. 22-29, 1984) Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics (ISSN 0021-9169), vol. 47, Aug.-Oct. 1985, p. 781-789.
Availability Source: Other Sources
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