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Record Details

Record 31 of 9050
Human physiological adaptation to extended Space Flight and its implications for Space Station
Author and Affiliation:
Kutyna, F. A.(GE Management and Technical Services Co., Houston, TX, United States)
Shumate, W. H.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Abstract: Current work evaluating short-term space flight physiological data on the homeostatic changes due to weightlessness is presented as a means of anticipating Space Station long-term effects. An integrated systems analysis of current data shows a vestibulo-sensory adaptation within days; a loss of body mass, fluids, and electrolytes, stabilizing in a month; and a loss in red cell mass over a month. But bone demineralization which did not level off is seen as the biggest concern. Computer algorithms have been developed to simulate the human adaptation to weightlessness. So far these paradigms have been backed up by flight data and it is hoped that they will provide valuable information for future Space Station design. A series of explanatory schematics is attached.
Publication Date: Jul 01, 1985
Document ID:
19860038764
(Acquired Nov 28, 1995)
Accession Number: 86A23502
Subject Category: AEROSPACE MEDICINE
Report/Patent Number: SAE PAPER 851311
Document Type: Preprint
Publisher Information: United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NAS9-17133
Financial Sponsor: NASA; United States
Organization Source: Management and Technical Services Co.; Houston, TX, United States
NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Description: 8p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: BIOASTRONAUTICS; LONG DURATION SPACE FLIGHT; MANNED SPACE FLIGHT; PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES; SPACE STATIONS; WEIGHTLESSNESS; ALGORITHMS; BODY WEIGHT; BONE DEMINERALIZATION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; PULMONARY FUNCTIONS; SPACE COMMERCIALIZATION
Imprint And Other Notes: AIAA, SAE, ASME, AIChE, and ASMA, Intersociety Conference on Environmental Systems, 15th, San Francisco, CA, July 15-17, 1985. 8 p.
Availability Source: Other Sources
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