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Effect of the greenhouse gases (CO2, H2O, SO2) on Martian paleoclimateThere is general agreement that certain surface features on Mars are indicative of the presence of liquid water at various times in the geologic past. In particular, the valley networks are difficult to explain by a mechanism other than the flow of liquid water. It has been suggested in several studies that a thick CO2 atmosphere on Mars early in its history could have provided a greenhouse warming that would have allowed the flow of water either on the surface or just below the surface. However, this effect was examined with a detailed radiation model, and it was found that if reduced solar luminosity early in the history of the solar system is taken into account, even three bars of CO2 will not provide sufficient greeenhouse warming. The addition of water vapor and sulflur dioxide (both plausible gases that may have been emitted by Martian volcanoes) to the atmosphere also fail to warm the surface above 273 K for reduced solar luminosity conditions. The increase in temperature may be large enough, however, for the formation of these features by brines.
Document ID
19860049981
Document Type
Reprint (Version printed in journal)
Authors
Postawko, S. E. (Hawaii, University Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, Honolulu, United States)
Kuhn, W. R. (Michigan, University Ann Arbor, United States)
Date Acquired
August 12, 2013
Publication Date
March 30, 1986
Publication Information
Publication: Journal of Geophysical Research
Volume: 91
ISSN: 0148-0227
Subject Category
LUNAR AND PLANETARY EXPLORATION
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: NSG-7308
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other