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Strange starsStrange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.
Document ID
19870035022
Document Type
Reprint (Version printed in journal)
External Source(s)
Authors
Alcock, Charles
(Massachusetts Inst. of Tech. Cambridge, MA, United States)
Farhi, Edward
(Massachusetts Inst. of Tech. Cambridge, MA, United States)
Olinto, Angela
(MIT Cambridge, MA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 13, 2013
Publication Date
November 1, 1986
Publication Information
Publication: Astrophysical Journal, Part 1
Volume: 310
ISSN: 0004-637X
Subject Category
Astrophysics
Accession Number
87A22296
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: NSG-7643
CONTRACT_GRANT: NGL-22-009-638
CONTRACT_GRANT: DE-AC03-76ER-03069
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other

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