NASA Logo

NTRS

NTRS - NASA Technical Reports Server

Back to Results
Interlaminar fracture in carbon fiber/thermoplastic compositesThe surfaces of commercial carbon fibers are generally chemically cleaned or oxidized and then coated with an oligomeric sizing to optimize their adhesion to epoxy matrix resins. Evidence from fractography, from embedded fiber testing and from fracture energies suggests that these standard treatments are relatively ineffective for thermoplastic matrices. This evidence is reviewed and model thermoplastic composites (polyphenylene oxide/high strain carbon fibers) are used to demonstrate how differences in adhesion can lead to a twofold change in interlaminar fracture toughness. The potential for improved adhesion via plasma modification of fiber surfaces is discussed. Finally, a surprising case of fiber-catalyzed resin degradation is described.
Document ID
19910036696
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Hinkley, J. A. (NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA, United States)
Bascom, W. D. (Utah, University Salt Lake City, United States)
Allred, R. E. (PDA Engineering Albuquerque, NM, United States)
Date Acquired
August 15, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1990
Subject Category
COMPOSITE MATERIALS
Meeting Information
Symposium on Interfaces in Composites(Boston, MA)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other