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Record 1 of 4206
Elements of designing for cost
Author and Affiliation:
Dean, Edwin B.(NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States)
Unal, Resit(Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, United States)
Abstract: During recent history in the United States, government systems development has been performance driven. As a result, systems within a class have experienced exponentially increasing cost over time in fixed year dollars. Moreover, little emphasis has been placed on reducing cost. This paper defines designing for cost and presents several tools which, if used in the engineering process, offer the promise of reducing cost. Although other potential tools exist for designing for cost, this paper focuses on rules of thumb, quality function deployment, Taguchi methods, concurrent engineering, and activity-based costing. Each of these tools has been demonstrated to reduce cost if used within the engineering process.
Publication Date: Feb 01, 1992
Document ID:
19920050611
(Acquired Nov 22, 1995)
Accession Number: 92A33235
Subject Category: ECONOMICS AND COST ANALYSIS
Report/Patent Number: AIAA PAPER 92-1057
Document Type: Preprint
Publisher Information: United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA; United States
Organization Source: NASA Langley Research Center; Hampton, VA, United States
Description: 8p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: COST ANALYSIS; COST REDUCTION; DESIGN TO COST; CONCURRENT ENGINEERING; OPTIMIZATION; QUALITY CONTROL
Imprint And Other Notes: AIAA, Aerospace Design Conference, Irvine, CA, Feb. 3-6, 1992. 8 p.
Availability Source: Other Sources
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