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Record Details

Record 96 of 3730
Vestibuloocular reflex of rhesus monkeys after spaceflight
Author and Affiliation:
Cohen, Bernard(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Kozlovskaia, Inessa(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Raphan, Theodore(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Solomon, David(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Helwig, Denice(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Cohen, Nathaniel(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Sirota, Mikhail(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Iakushin, Sergei(Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, Brooklyn College, NY, Institute of Biomedical Problems)
Abstract: The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of two rhesus monkeys was recorded before and after 14 days of spaceflight. The gain (eye velocity/head velocity) of the horizontal VOR, tested 15 and 18 h after landing, was approximately equal to preflight values. The dominant time constant of the animal tested 15 h after landing was equivalent to that before flight. During nystagmus induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), the latency, rising time constant, steady-state eye velocity, and phase of modulation in eye velocity and eye position with respect to head position were similar in both monkeys before and after flight. There were changes in the amplitude of modulation of horizontal eye velocity during steady-state OVAR and in the ability to discharge stored activity rapidly by tilting during postrotatory nystagmus (tilt dumping) after flight: OVAR modulations were larger, and tilt dumping was lost in the one animal tested on the day of landing and for several days thereafter. If the gain and time constant of the horizontal VOR exchange in microgravity, they must revert to normal soon after landing. The changes that were observed suggest that adaptation to microgravity had caused alterations in way that the central nervous system processes otolith input.
Publication Date: Aug 01, 1992
Document ID:
19920068864
(Acquired Nov 22, 1995)
Accession Number: 92A51488
Subject Category: LIFE SCIENCES (GENERAL)
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Journal of Applied Physiology, Supplement (ISSN 8750-7587); 73; 2, Au
Publisher Information: United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NAG2-573
Financial Sponsor: NASA; United States
Organization Source: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA, United States
Description: 11p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: BIOASTRONAUTICS; REFLEXES; SPACE FLIGHT STRESS; VESTIBULAR NYSTAGMUS; GRAVITATIONAL PHYSIOLOGY; MONKEYS; OTOLITH ORGANS; ROTATION
Imprint And Other Notes: Journal of Applied Physiology, Supplement (ISSN 8750-7587), vol. 73, no. 2, Aug. 1992, p. 121S-131S.
Availability Source: Other Sources
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