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Degradation of radiator performance on Mars due to dustAn artificial mineral of the approximate elemental composition of Martian soil was manufactured, crushed, and sorted into four different size ranges. Dust particles from three of these size ranges were applied to arc-textured Nb-1 percent Zr and Cu radiator surfaces to assess their effect on radiator performance. Particles larger than 75 microns did not have sufficient adhesive forces to adhere to the samples at angles greater than about 27 deg. Pre-deposited dust layers were largely removed by clear wind velocities greater than 40 m/s, or by dust-laden wind velocities as low as 25 m/s. Smaller dust grains were more difficult to remove. Abrasion was found to be significant only in high velocity winds (89 m/s or greater). Dust-laden winds were found to be more abrasive than clear wind. Initially dusted samples abraded less than initially clear samples in dust laden wind. Smaller dust particles of the simulant proved to be more abrasive than large. This probably indicates that the larger particles were in fact agglomerates.
Document ID
19930006427
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Gaier, James R. (NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH, United States)
Perez-Davis, Marla E. (NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH, United States)
Rutledge, Sharon K. (NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH, United States)
Forkapa, Mark (Cleveland State Univ. OH., United States)
Date Acquired
September 6, 2013
Publication Date
November 1, 1992
Publication Information
Publication: NASA. Goddard Space Flight Center, The Seventeenth Space Simulation Conference. Terrestrial Test for Space Success
Subject Category
SPACECRAFT DESIGN, TESTING AND PERFORMANCE
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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IDRelationTitle19930006404Analytic PrimaryThe Seventeenth Space Simulation Conference. Terrestrial Test for Space Success