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Modeling the effect of land use on carbon storage in the forests of the Pacific NorthwestThere is concern as to how the balance of carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem will change in response to a variety of land use practices. A study is described in which a methodology is being developed to help narrow this uncertainty for the temperate forets of the Pacific Northwest region of the US. A carbon storage model is being developed to respond to forest harvesting, the dominant use of land in the region. By linking the carbon model to satellite imagery and a climate simulation model, the current amount of carbon stored in the forests of the Pacific northwest is estimated. The archive of Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) images permits a 20-year historical perspective of land use changes in the region. With these data, the recent impact of regional land use in forest carbon stores is assessed.
Document ID
19930063833
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Cohen, Warren B. (USDA, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Corvallis OR, United States)
Wallin, David O. (NASA Headquarters Washington, DC United States)
Harmon, Mark E. (NASA Headquarters Washington, DC United States)
Sollins, Philip (NASA Headquarters Washington, DC United States)
Daly, Christopher (NASA Headquarters Washington, DC United States)
Ferrell, William K. (Oregon State Univ. Corvallis, United States)
Date Acquired
August 16, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1992
Publication Information
Publication: In: IGARSS '92; Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Houston, TX, May 26-29, 1992. Vol. 2 (A93-47551 20-43)
Subject Category
EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
Funding Number(s)
PROJECT: RTOP 579-43-05-01
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other

Related Records

IDRelationTitle19930063554Analytic PrimaryIGARSS '92; Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Houston, TX, May 26-29, 1992. Vols. 1 & 2