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Launch vehicle selection modelOver the next 50 years, humans will be heading for the Moon and Mars to build scientific bases to gain further knowledge about the universe and to develop rewarding space activities. These large scale projects will last many years and will require large amounts of mass to be delivered to Low Earth Orbit (LEO). It will take a great deal of planning to complete these missions in an efficient manner. The planning of a future Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) will significantly impact the overall multi-year launching cost for the vehicle fleet depending upon when the HLLV will be ready for use. It is desirable to develop a model in which many trade studies can be performed. In one sample multi-year space program analysis, the total launch vehicle cost of implementing the program reduced from 50 percent to 25 percent. This indicates how critical it is to reduce space logistics costs. A linear programming model has been developed to answer such questions. The model is now in its second phase of development, and this paper will address the capabilities of the model and its intended uses. The main emphasis over the past year was to make the model user friendly and to incorporate additional realistic constraints that are difficult to represent mathematically. We have developed a methodology in which the user has to be knowledgeable about the mission model and the requirements of the payloads. We have found a representation that will cut down the solution space of the problem by inserting some preliminary tests to eliminate some infeasible vehicle solutions. The paper will address the handling of these additional constraints and the methodology for incorporating new costing information utilizing learning curve theory. The paper will review several test cases that will explore the preferred vehicle characteristics and the preferred period of construction, i.e., within the next decade, or in the first decade of the next century. Finally, the paper will explore the interaction between the primary mission model (all payloads going from Earth to Low Earth Orbit (LEO)) and the secondary mission model (all payloads from LEO to Lunar and LEO to Mars and return).
Document ID
19940004234
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Montoya, Alex J. (Colorado Univ. Boulder, CO, United States)
Date Acquired
August 16, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1990
Publication Information
Publication: Second Annual Symposium
Subject Category
SYSTEMS ANALYSIS
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.
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