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Record Details

Record 20 of 5828
Lunar rover navigation concepts
Author and Affiliation:
Burke, James D.(Planetary Society, Pasadena, CA., United States)
Abstract: With regard to the navigation of mobile lunar vehicles on the surface, candidate techniques are reviewed and progress of simulations and experiments made up to now are described. Progress that can be made through precursor investigations on Earth is considered. In the early seventies the problem was examined in a series of relevant tests made in the California desert. Meanwhile, Apollo rovers made short exploratory sorties and robotic Lunokhods traveled over modest distances on the Moon. In these early missions some of the required methods were demonstrated. The navigation problem for a lunar traverse can be viewed in three parts: to determine the starting point with enough accuracy to enable the desired mission; to determine the event sequence required to reach the site of each traverse objective; and to redetermine actual positions enroute. The navigator's first tool is a map made from overhead imagery. The Moon was almost completely photographed at moderate resolution by spacecraft launched in the sixties, but that data set provides imprecise topographic and selenodetic information. Therefore, more advanced orbital missions are now proposed as part of a resumed lunar exploration program. With the mapping coverage expected from such orbiters, it will be possible to use a combination of visual landmark navigation and external radio and optical references (Earth and Sun) to achieve accurate surface navigation almost everywhere on the near side of the Moon. On the far side and in permanently dark polar areas, there are interesting exploration targets where additional techniques will have to be used.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 1993
Document ID:
19940018913
(Acquired Dec 28, 1995)
Accession Number: 94N23386
Subject Category: LUNAR AND PLANETARY EXPLORATION
Document Type: Conference Paper
Publication Information: CNES, Missions, Technologies, and Design of Planetary Mobile Vehicles; p. p 167-179
Publisher Information: United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA; United States
Organization Source: Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech.; Pasadena, CA, United States
Description: 13p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: LUNAR ROVING VEHICLES; NAVIGATION AIDS; SURFACE NAVIGATION; IMAGING TECHNIQUES; LANDMARKS; MAPPING; RADIO NAVIGATION; REMOTE CONTROL
Imprint And Other Notes: In CNES, Missions, Technologies, and Design of Planetary Mobile Vehicles p 167-179 (SEE N94-23373 06-91)
Miscellaneous Notes: Sponsored by NASA, Washington
Availability Source: Other Sources
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