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Record Details

Record 18 of 5265
Characterization of spacecraft humidity condensate
Author and Affiliation:
Muckle, Susan(Krug Life Sciences, Inc., Houston, TX., United States)
Schultz, John R.(Krug Life Sciences, Inc., Houston, TX., United States)
Sauer, Richard L.(NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Abstract: When construction of Space Station Freedom reaches the Permanent Manned Capability (PMC) stage, the Water Recovery and Management Subsystem will be fully operational such that (distilled) urine, spent hygiene water, and humidity condensate will be reclaimed to provide water of potable quality. The reclamation technologies currently baselined to process these waste waters include adsorption, ion exchange, catalytic oxidation, and disinfection. To ensure that the baseline technologies will be able to effectively remove those compounds presenting a health risk to the crew, the National Research Council has recommended that additional information be gathered on specific contaminants in waste waters representative of those to be encountered on the Space Station. With the application of new analytical methods and the analysis of waste water samples more representative of the Space Station environment, advances in the identification of the specific contaminants continue to be made. Efforts by the Water and Food Analytical Laboratory at JSC were successful in enlarging the database of contaminants in humidity condensate. These efforts have not only included the chemical characterization of condensate generated during ground-based studies, but most significantly the characterization of cabin and Spacelab condensate generated during Shuttle missions. The analytical results presented in this paper will be used to show how the composition of condensate varies amongst enclosed environments and thus the importance of collecting condensate from an environment close to that of the proposed Space Station. Although advances were made in the characterization of space condensate, complete characterization, particularly of the organics, requires further development of analytical methods.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 1994
Document ID:
19940029153
(Acquired Dec 28, 1995)
Accession Number: 94N33659
Subject Category: MAN/SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE SUPPORT
Coverage: Abstract Only
Document Type: Conference Paper
Publication Information: Seventh Annual Workshop on Space Operations Applications and Research (SOAR 1993), Volume 2; p 600
Publisher Information: United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA; United States
Organization Source: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: CONDENSATES; HUMIDITY; ION EXCHANGING; POTABLE WATER; SPACECREWS; WASTE WATER; WATER MANAGEMENT; WATER QUALITY; WATER RECLAMATION; ADSORPTION; AEROSPACE MEDICINE; CONTAMINANTS; DATA BASES; DISTILLATION; OXIDATION; SPACE SHUTTLE MISSIONS; SPACE STATION FREEDOM; SPACELAB
Imprint And Other Notes: In its Seventh Annual Workshop on Space Operations Applications and Research (SOAR 1993), Volume 2 p 600 (SEE N94-33612 10-99)
Availability Notes: Abstract Only; Available from STI Support Services only as part of the entire parent document
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