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measurement of the fluorescence of crop residues: a tool for controlling soil erosionManagement of crop residues, the portion of a crop left in the field after harvest, is an important conservation practice for minimizing soil erosion and for improving water quality. Quantification of crop residue cover is required to evaluate the effectiveness of conservation tillage practices. Methods are needed to quantify residue cover that are rapid, accurate, and objective. The fluorescence of crop residue was found to be a broadband phenomenon with emission maxima at 420 to 495 nm for excitations of 350 to 420 nm. Soils had low intensity broadband emissions over the 400 to 690 nm region for excitations of 300 to 600 nm. The range of relative fluorescence intensities for the crop residues was much greater than the fluorescence observed of the soils. As the crop residues decompose their blue fluorescence values approach the fluorescence of the soil. Fluorescence techniques are concluded to be less ambiguous and better suited for discriminating crop residues and soils than reflectance methods. If properly implemented, fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify, not only crop residue cover, but also photosynthetic efficiency in the field.
Document ID
19950010671
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Daughtry, C. S. T.
(Agricultural Research Service Beltsville, MD., United States)
Mcmurtrey, J. E., III
(Agricultural Research Service Beltsville, MD., United States)
Chappelle, E. W.
(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Hunter, W. J.
(Agricultural Research Service Fort Collins, CO., United States)
Date Acquired
August 16, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1994
Publication Information
Publication: CNES, Proceedings of 6th International Symposium on Physical Measurements and Signatures in Remote Sensing
Subject Category
EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.
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