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Record 70 of 13210
Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen spacecraft cell and battery design
Author and Affiliation:
Coates, Dwaine(Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc., Joplin, MO, United States)
Wright, Doug(Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc., Joplin, MO, United States)
Repplinger, Ron(Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc., Joplin, MO, United States)
Abstract: The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) NiH2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth orbital satellites and have accumulated more than 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard NiH2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV NiH2 technology flight heritage and database. The advanced cell design offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell configuration and a reduced parts count. The internal electrode stack is a prismatic flat-plate arrangement. The flat individual cell pressure vessel provides a maximum direct thermal path for removing heat from the electrode stack. The cell geometry also minimizes multiple-cell battery packaging constraints by using an established end-plateltie-rod battery design. A major design advantage is that the battery support structure is efficiently required to restrain only the force applied to a portion of the end cell. As the cells are stacked in series to achieve the desired system voltage, this increment of the total battery weight becomes small. The geometry of the DPV cell promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and places all cell terminals along the length of the battery. The resulting ability to minimize intercell wiring offers additional design simplicity and significant weight savings. The DPV battery design offers significant cost and weight savings advantages while providing minimal design risks. Cell and battery level design issues will be addressed including mechanical, electrical and thermal design aspects. A design performance analysis will be presented at both the cell and battery level. The DPV is capable of delivering up to 76 Watt-hours per kilogram (Wh/kg) at the cell level and 70 Wh/kg at the full battery level. This represents a 40 percent increase in specific energy at the cell level and a 60 percent increase in specific energy at the battery level compared to current IPV NiH2 technology.
Publication Date: Apr 01, 1995
Document ID:
19950023840
(Acquired Dec 28, 1995)
Accession Number: 95N30261
Subject Category: ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Coverage: Abstract Only
Document Type: Conference Paper
Publication Information: NASA. Lewis Research Center, Space Electrochemical Research and Technology. Abstracts; p 13
Publisher Information: United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA; United States
Organization Source: Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc.; Advanced Systems Operation.; Joplin, MO, United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: COST REDUCTION; DESIGN ANALYSIS; NICKEL HYDROGEN BATTERIES; PRESSURE VESSELS; SPACECRAFT POWER SUPPLIES; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRODES; RELIABILITY ANALYSIS; SPACECRAFT ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; WIRING
Imprint And Other Notes: In NASA. Lewis Research Center, Space Electrochemical Research and Technology. Abstracts p 13 (SEE N95-30255 10-44)
Availability Source: Other Sources
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