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Cosmic microwave background anisotropies in cold dark matter models with cosmological constant: The intermediate versus large angular scalesWe obtain predictions for cosmic microwave background anisotropies at angular scales near 1 deg in the context of cold dark matter models with a nonzero cosmological constant, normalized to the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) detection. The results are compared to those computed in the matter-dominated models. We show that the coherence length of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy is almost insensitive to cosmological parameters, and the rms amplitude of the anisotropy increases moderately with decreasing total matter density, while being most sensitive to the baryon abundance. We apply these results in the statistical analysis of the published data from the UCSB South Pole (SP) experiment (Gaier et al. 1992; Schuster et al. 1993). We reject most of the Cold Dark Matter (CDM)-Lambda models at the 95% confidence level when both SP scans are simulated together (although the combined data set renders less stringent limits than the Gaier et al. data alone). However, the Schuster et al. data considered alone as well as the results of some other recent experiments (MAX, MSAM, Saskatoon), suggest that typical temperature fluctuations on degree scales may be larger than is indicated by the Gaier et al. scan. If so, CDM-Lambda models may indeed provide, from a point of view of CMB anisotropies, an acceptable alternative to flat CDM models.
Document ID
19950036129
Document Type
Reprint (Version printed in journal)
External Source(s)
Authors
Stompor, Radoslaw
(Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM United States)
Gorski, Krzysztof M.
(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Date Acquired
August 16, 2013
Publication Date
February 20, 1994
Publication Information
Publication: Astrophysical Journal, Part 2 - Letters
Volume: 422
Issue: 2
ISSN: 0004-637X
Subject Category
Astrophysics
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other
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