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Monitoring changes in Greater Yellowstone Lake water quality following the 1988 wildfiresThe fires that burned the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) during the summer of 1988 were the largest ever recorded for the region. Wildfire can have profound indirect effects on associated aquatic ecosystems by increased nutrient loading, sediment, erosion, and runoff. Satellite remote sensing and water quality sampling were used to compare pre- versus post-fire conditions in the GYA's large oliotrophic (high transparency, low productivity) lakes. Inputs of suspended sediment to Jackson Lake appear to have increased. Yellowstone Lake has not shown any discernable shift in water quality. The insights gained separately from the Landsat Thematic and NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) remote sensing systems, along with conventional in-situ sampling, can be combined into a useful water quality monitoring tool.
Document ID
19950052913
Document Type
Reprint (Version printed in journal)
Authors
Lathrop, Richard G., Jr. (Rutgers Univ. New Brunswick, NJ, United States)
Vande Castle, John D. (Washington Univ. Seattle, WA, United States)
Brass, James A. (NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 16, 2013
Publication Date
September 1, 1994
Publication Information
Publication: Geocarto International
Volume: 9
Issue: 3
ISSN: 1010-6049
Subject Category
EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: NCA-539
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other