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Record Details

Record 34 of 29084
Emergency medical service (EMS): A unique flight environment
Author and Affiliation:
Shively, R. Jay(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, US, United States)
Abstract: The EMS flight environment is unique in today's aviation. The pilots must respond quickly to emergency events and often fly to landing zones where they have never been before . The time from initially receiving a call to being airborne can be as little as two to three minutes. Often the EMS pilot is the only aviation professional on site, they have no operations people or other pilots to aid them in making decisons. Further, since they are often flying to accident scenes, not airports, there is often complete weather and condition information. Therefore, the initial decision that the pilot must make, accepting or declining a flight, can become very difficult. The accident rate of EMS helicopters has been relatively high over the past years. NASA-Ames research center has taken several steps in an attempt to aid EMS pilots in their decision making and situational awareness. A preflight risk assessment system (SAFE) was developed to aid pilots in their decision making, and was tested at an EMS service. The resutls of the study were promising and a second version incorporating the lessons learned is under development. A second line of research was the development of a low cost electronic chart display (ECD). This is a digital map display to help pilots maintain geographical orientation. Another thrust was undertaken in conjunction with the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). This involved publicizing the ASRS to EMS pilots and personnel, and calling each of the reporters back to gather additional information. This paper will discuss these efforts and how they may positively impact the safety of EMS operations.
Publication Date: Apr 01, 1993
Document ID:
19950063604
(Acquired Dec 28, 1995)
Accession Number: 95A95203
Subject Category: AIR TRANSPORTATION AND SAFETY
Document Type: Conference Paper
Publication Information: fe sciences and spac; (SEE A95-95037)
Publisher Information: Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA; United States
Organization Source: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA, United States
Description: 4p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: EMERGENCIES; ENVIRONMENTS; FLIGHT SAFETY; HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING; MEDICAL SERVICES; PILOT PERFORMANCE; RISK; ACCIDENT PREVENTION; AIRCRAFT ACCIDENTS; DISORIENTATION; DISPLAY DEVICES; HELICOPTERS; HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING; PILOT ERROR
Imprint And Other Notes: In: International Symposium on Aviation Psychology, 7th, Columbus, OH, April 26-29, 1993. Vols. 1 & 2 . A95-95037, p. 1016-1019
Availability Source: Other Sources
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