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Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue StudiesThe skin repair studies started to be problematic for the following reasons: (1) It was very difficult to locate the wound and many lesions were not of the same dimensions. A considerable amount of time was devoted to the identification of the wound using polarized light. We understand that this experiment was added on to the overall project. Marking of the wound site and standard dimensions should be recommended for the next flight experiment. (2) The tissue was frozen, therefore thawing and fixation caused problems with some of the immunocytochemical staining for obtaining better special resolution with light microscopy image processing. Despite these problems, we were unable to detect any significant qualitative differences for the following wound markers: (1) Collagen Type 3, (2) Hematotoxylin and Eosin, and (3) Macrophage Factor 13. All protein markers were isolated from rat sources and antibodies prepared and tested for cross reactivity with other molecules at the University of Wisconsin Hybridoma Facility. However, rat skin from the non lesioned site 'normal' showed interesting biochemical results. Skin was prepared for the following measurements: (1) DNA content, (2) Collagen content by hydroxyproline, and (3) uronic acid content and estimation of ground substance. The results indicated there was a non-significant increase (10%) in the DNA concentration of skin from flight animals. However, the data expressed as a ratio DNA/Collagen estimates the cell or nuclear density that supports a given quantity of collagen showed a dramatic increase in the flight group (33%). This means flight conditions may have slowed down collagen secretion and/or increased cell proliferation in adult rat skin. Further biochemical tests are being done to determine the crosslinking of elastin which will enhance the insight to assessing changes in skin turnover.
Document ID
19960029004
Document Type
Other
Authors
Vailas, A. C. (Wisconsin Univ. Madison, WI United States)
Grindeland, R. (NASA Moffett Field, CA United States)
Ashman, R. (Texas Univ. Austin, TX United States)
Choy, V. (Wisconsin Univ. Madison, WI United States)
Durnova, G. (Institute of Biomedical Problems Moscow, USSR)
Graf, B. (Wisconsin Univ. Madison, WI United States)
Griffith, P. (Wisconsin Univ. Madison, WI United States)
Kaplansky, A. S. (Institute of Biomedical Problems Moscow, USSR)
Kolis, S. (Wisconsin Univ. Madison, WI United States)
Martinez, D. (Wisconsin Univ. Madison, WI United States)
Rao, J. S. (Veterans Administration Hospital Kansas City, MO United States)
Rayford, A. R. (Veterans Administration Hospital Kansas City, MO United States)
Reddy, B. R. (Veterans Administration Hospital Kansas City, MO United States)
Sears, J. (Iowa Univ. Iowa City, IA United States)
Thielke, R. (Wisconsin Univ. Madison, WI United States)
Ulm, M. (Wisconsin Univ. Madison, WI United States)
Vanderby, R. (Wisconsin Univ. Madison, WI United States)
Date Acquired
August 17, 2013
Publication Date
September 1, 1994
Publication Information
Publication: US Experiments Flown on the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044
Subject Category
Life Sciences (General)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.
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