NASA Logo

NTRS

NTRS - NASA Technical Reports Server

Back to Results
testing of electroformed deposited iridium/powder metallurgy rhenium rocketsHigh-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials offer the thermal margin for high performance and extended lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets. Rhenium (Re) coated with iridium (Ir) allow hours of operation at 2200 C on Earth-storable propellants. One process for manufacturing Ir/Re rocket chambers is the fabrication of Re substrates by powder metallurgy (PM) and the application of Ir coatings by using electroformed deposition (ED). ED Ir coatings, however, have been found to be porous and poorly adherent. The integrity of ED Ir coatings could be improved by densification after the electroforming process. This report summarizes the testing of two 22-N, ED Ir/PM Re rocket chambers that were subjected to post-deposition treatments in an effort to densify the Ir coating. One chamber was vacuum annealed, while the other chamber was subjected to hot isostatic pressure (HIP). The chambers were tested on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen propellants, at mixture ratios that simulated the oxidizing environments of Earth-storable propellants. ne annealed ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 24 firings and 4.58 hr at a mixture ratio of 4.2. After only 9 firings, the annealed ED Ir coating began to blister and spall upstream of the throat. The blistering and spalling were similar to what had been experienced with unannealed, as-deposited ED Ir coatings. The HIP ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 91 firings and 11.45 hr at mixture ratios of 3.2 and 4.2. The HIP ED Ir coating remained adherent to the Re substrate throughout testing; there were no visible signs of coating degradation. Metallography revealed, however, thinning of the HIP Ir coating and occasional pores in the Re layer upstream of the throat. Pinholes in the Ir coating may have provided a path for oxidation of the Re substrate at these locations. The HIP ED Ir coating proved to be more effective than vacuum annealed and as-deposited ED Ir. Further densification is still required to match the integrity of chemically vapor deposited Ir coatings. Despite this, the successful long duration testing of the HIP ED Ir chamber, in an oxidizing environment comparable to Earth-storable propellants, demonstrated the viability of this Ir/Re rocket fabrication process.
Document ID
19960049927
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Reed, Brian D.
(NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland,OH United States)
Dickerson, Robert
(NYMA, Inc. Brook Park, OH United States)
Date Acquired
September 6, 2013
Publication Date
July 1, 1996
Subject Category
Spacecraft Propulsion and Power
Report/Patent Number
NAS 1.15:107172
NASA-TM-107172
E-10124
Meeting Information
JANNAF Propulsion Meeting(Tampa, FL)
Funding Number(s)
PROJECT: RTOP 242-70-02
CONTRACT_GRANT: NAS3-27186
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

Available Downloads

NameType 19960049927.pdf STI