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Record 49 of 687
Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities
Availability: Available in document 19990009630 on p. 360-364, or for help Contact the Information Desk
Author and Affiliation:
Furnas, Randall B.(NASA, Washington, DC United States)
Abstract: The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 1989
Document ID:
19990009668
(Acquired Jan 16, 1999)
Subject Category: ASTRONAUTICS (GENERAL)
Document Type: Conference Paper
Publication Information: SEE parent document record, "The Next Generation Space Telescope"; p. 360-364
Publisher Information: Space Telescope Science Inst., Baltimore, MD, United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA; Washington, DC United States
Organization Source: NASA; Washington, DC United States
Description: 5p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: SPACE LOGISTICS; SPACECRAFT LAUNCHING; SPACECRAFT DESIGN; COST REDUCTION; DELTA LAUNCH VEHICLE; TITAN 4 LAUNCH VEHICLE; SHUTTLE DERIVED VEHICLES; ATLAS LAUNCH VEHICLES; ENERGIYA LAUNCH VEHICLE; PAYLOADS
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