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Kennedy Space Center Coronary Heart Disease Risk Screening ProgramThe number one cause of death in the U.S. is coronary heart disease (CHD). It is probably a major cause of death and disability in the lives of employees at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as well. The KSC Biomedical Office used a multifactorial mathematical formula from the Framingham Heart Study to calculate CHD risk probabilities for individuals in a segment of the KSC population that required medical evaluation for job certification. Those assessed to be high-risk probabilities will be targeted for intervention. Every year, several thousand KSC employees require medical evaluations for job related certifications. Most medical information for these evaluations is gathered on-site at one of the KSC or Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) medical clinics. The formula used in the Framingham Heart Study allows calculation of a person's probability of acquiring CHD within 10 years. The formula contains the following variables: Age, Diabetes, Smoking, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Blood Pressure (Systolic or Diastolic), Cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. The formula is also gender specific. It was used to calculate the 10-year probabilities of CHD in KSC employees who required medical evaluations for job certifications during a one-year time frame. This KSC population was profiled and CHD risk reduction interventions could be targeted to those at high risk. Population risk could also be periodically reevaluated to determine the effectiveness of intervention. A 10-year CHD risk probability can be calculated for an individual quite easily while gathering routine medical information. An employee population's CHD risk probability can be profiled graphically revealing high risk segments of the population which can be targeted for risk reduction intervention. The small audience of NASA/contractor physicians, nurses and exercise/fitness professionals at the breakout session received the lecture very well. Approximately one third indicated by a show of hands that they would be interested in implementing a similar program at their NASA Center. Questions were asked pertaining to standardization for age, the validity of using the idealized male values also for the female population, and indications of the screening test's sensitivity and specificity.
Document ID
19990040991
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Tipton, David A. (NASA Kennedy Space Center Cocoa Beach, FL United States)
Scarpa, Philip J. (NASA Kennedy Space Center Cocoa Beach, FL United States)
Date Acquired
August 19, 2013
Publication Date
February 1, 1999
Publication Information
Publication: Proceedings from the 1998 Occupational Health Conference: Benchmarking for Excellence
Subject Category
Aerospace Medicine
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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IDRelationTitle19990040967Analytic PrimaryProceedings from the 1998 Occupational Health Conference: Benchmarking for Excellence