NASA Logo, External Link
Facebook icon, External Link to NASA STI page on Facebook Twitter icon, External Link to NASA STI on Twitter YouTube icon, External Link to NASA STI Channel on YouTube RSS icon, External Link to New NASA STI RSS Feed AddThis share icon
 

Record Details

Record 33 of 980
Geospace Magnetospheric Dynamics Mission
Author and Affiliation:
Russell, C. T.(California Univ., Dept. of Earth and Space Science, Los Angeles, CA United States)
Kluever, C.(Missouri Univ., Kansas City, MO United States)
Burch, J. L.(Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX United States)
Fennell, J. F.(Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, CA United States)
Hack, K.(NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH United States)
Hillard, G. B.(NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH United States)
Kurth, W. S.(Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA United States)
Lopez, R. E.(Maryland Univ., College Park, MD United States)
Luhmann, J. G.(California Univ., Berkeley, CA United States)
Martin, J. B.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD United States) Show more authors
Abstract: The Geospace Magnetospheric Dynamics (GMD) mission is designed to provide very closely spaced, multipoint measurements in the thin current sheets of the magnetosphere to determine the relation between small scale processes and the global dynamics of the magnetosphere. Its trajectory is specifically designed to optimize the time spent in the current layers and to minimize radiation damage to the spacecraft. Observations are concentrated in the region 8 to 40 R(sub E) The mission consists of three phases. After a launch into geostationary transfer orbit the orbits are circularized to probe the region between geostationary orbit and the magnetopause; next the orbit is elongated keeping perigee at the magnetopause while keeping the line of apsides down the tail. Finally, once apogee reaches 40 R(sub E) the inclination is changed so that the orbit will match the profile of the noon-midnight meridian of the magnetosphere. This mission consists of 4 solar electrically propelled vehicles, each with a single NSTAR thruster utilizing 100 kg of Xe to tour the magnetosphere in the course of a 4.4 year mission, the same thrusters that have been successfully tested on the Deep Space-1 mission.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 1998
Document ID:
19990042052
(Acquired Jun 11, 1999)
Subject Category: GEOPHYSICS
Document Type: Reprint
Publication Information: Science Closure and Enabling Technologies for Constellation Class Missions; 58-62
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NAG5-3380
Financial Sponsor: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD United States
Organization Source: NASA Lewis Research Center; Cleveland, OH United States
Description: In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: RADIATION DAMAGE; MAGNETOPAUSE; ION PROPULSION; CURRENT SHEETS; APSIDES; EARTH MAGNETOSPHERE; TRANSFER ORBITS; TRAJECTORIES; SPACE MISSIONS; PERIGEES; NOON; LAUNCHING; ION ENGINES; GEOSYNCHRONOUS ORBITS; DEEP SPACE 1 MISSION
Availability Source: Other Sources
› Back to Top
Find Similar Records
NASA Logo, External Link
NASA Official: Gerald Steeman
Site Curator: STI Program
Last Modified: August 22, 2011
Contact Us