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Record Details

Record 21 of 37567
Oxygen Generator System Mars In-Situ Propellant Production Precursor Flight
Author and Affiliation:
Sridhar, K. R.(Arizona Univ., Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Dept., Tucson, AZ United States)
Gottmann, M.(Arizona Univ., Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Dept., Tucson, AZ United States)
Baird, R. S.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX United States)
Abstract: The 2001 Lander to Mars will carry the first ever ISRU payload to Mars. This payload, the Mars In-situ Propellant production Precursor (MIP), will demonstrate a variety of technologies that will be required for future ISRU Mars indigenous material processing plant designs. One of those technologies is that of extracting oxygen from the predominantly carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars, a prerequisite for future sample return and human missions to Mars. The Oxygen Generator Subsystem (OGS) portion of the MIP will demonstrate this and is the focus of this paper. The primary objective of the OGS is to demonstrate the production of oxygen from Mars atmospheric gases. Secondary objectives are to measure the performance and reliability of oxygen generation hardware in actual mission environments over an extended time. Major constraints on the OGS design came from several sources. The Lander provides power to the system from solar power that is harnessed by photovoltaic arrays. This limited OGS to daytime only operations (six to eight hours) and a maximum power of 15W. The reliance on solar power necessitated thermal cycling of the OGS between Mars ambient and OGS operating temperatures. The Lander also limited the total mass of the MIP payload to 7.5 kg with a correspondingly small volume, and the OGS was one of six experiments in the MIP. Mass and volume were to be minimized. Another constraint was cost. Mission funding, as always, was tight. Cost was to be minimized. In short the OGS design had to be low power (<15 Watts), low mass (1 kg), low volume, low cost, and be capable of cyclical operations for an extended stay on Mars. After extensive research, a zirconia based solid oxide electrolyzer design was selected.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 1999
Document ID:
19990042262
(Acquired Jun 11, 1999)
Subject Category: PROPELLANTS AND FUELS
Document Type: Conference Paper
Publication Information: In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU 3) Technical Interchange Meeting: Abstracts; 33-34; (LPI-Contrib-963); (SEE 19990042245)
Financial Sponsor: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX United States
Organization Source: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX United States
Description: 2p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: MARS ATMOSPHERE; MANNED MARS MISSIONS; PAYLOADS; RETURN TO EARTH SPACE FLIGHT; MARS SAMPLE RETURN MISSIONS; OXYGEN SUPPLY EQUIPMENT; LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS; CARBON DIOXIDE; ROCKET PROPELLANTS; FLIGHT TESTS
Availability Notes: Abstract Only; Available from STI Support Services only as part of the entire parent document
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