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Record Details

Record 17 of 3746
Ozone Depletion at Mid-Latitudes: Coupling of Volcanic Aerosols and Temperature Variability to Anthropogenic Chlorine
External Online Source: doi:10.1029/98GL01293
Author and Affiliation:
Solomon, S.(National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, CO United States)
Portmann, R. W.(National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, CO United States)
Garcia, R. R.(National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO United States)
Randel, W.(National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO United States)
Wu, F.(National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO United States)
Nagatani, R.(National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Washington, DC United States)
Gleason, J.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD United States)
Thomason, L.(NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA United States)
Poole, L. R.(NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA United States)
McCormick, M. P.(Hampton Univ., Physics Dept., VA United States)
Abstract: Satellite observations of total ozone at 40-60 deg N are presented from a variety of instruments over the time period 1979-1997. These reveal record low values in 1992-3 (after Pinatubo) followed by partial but incomplete recovery. The largest post-Pinatubo reductions and longer-term trends occur in spring, providing a critical test for chemical theories of ozone depletion. The observations are shown to be consistent with current understanding of the chemistry of ozone depletion when changes in reactive chlorine and stratospheric aerosol abundances are considered along with estimates of wave-driven fluctuations in stratospheric temperatures derived from global temperature analyses. Temperature fluctuations are shown to make significant contributions to model calculated northern mid-latitude ozone depletion due to heterogeneous chlorine activation on liquid sulfate aerosols at temperatures near 200-210 K (depending upon water vapor pressure), particularly after major volcanic eruptions. Future mid-latitude ozone recovery will hence depend not only on chlorine recovery but also on temperature trends and/or variability, volcanic activity, and any trends in stratospheric sulfate aerosol.
Publication Date: Jun 01, 1998
Document ID:
19990064360
(Acquired Sep 10, 1999)
Subject Category: ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION
Report/Patent Number: Paper-98GL01293
Document Type: Reprint
Publication Information: Geophysical Research Letters; p. 1871-1874; (ISSN 0094-8534); Volume 25; No. 11
Publisher Information: American Geophysical Union, United Kingdom
Financial Sponsor: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD United States
Organization Source: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD United States
Description: 4p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: OZONE DEPLETION; TEMPERATE REGIONS; AIR POLLUTION; ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION; AEROSOLS; ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE; VARIATIONS; STRATOSPHERE; WATER VAPOR; VAPOR PRESSURE; SULFATES; CHLORINE
Availability Source: Other Sources
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