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Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma ProcessNext-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. Fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of shrinking budgets. Three technologies have been combined to produce an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Copper alloy NARloy-Z was replaced with a new high performance Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. Functional gradient technology, developed building composite cartridges for space furnaces was incorporated to add oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. NiCrAlY, utilized to produce durable protective coating for the space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (BPFTP) turbine blades, was used as the functional gradient material coating (FGM). The FGM not only serves as a protection from oxidation or blanching, the main cause of engine failure, but also serves as a thermal barrier because of its lower thermal conductivity, reducing the temperature of the combustion liner 200 F, from 1000 F to 800 F producing longer life. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost VPS process. VPS formed combustion chamber test articles have been formed with the FGM hot wall built in and hot fire tested, demonstrating for the first time a coating that will remain intact through the hot firing test, and with no apparent wear. Material physical properties and the hot firing tests are reviewed.
Document ID
20010021321
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Holmes, Richard
(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville, AL United States)
Elam, Sandra
(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville, AL United States)
Ellis, David L.
(GRC United States)
McKechnie, Timothy
(Plasma Processes Huntsville, AL United States)
Hickman, Robert
(Plasma Processes Huntsville, AL United States)
Rose, M. Franklin
Date Acquired
August 20, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 2001
Subject Category
Spacecraft Propulsion And Power
Meeting Information
Meeting: TMS Meeting
Location: New Orleans, LA
Country: United States
Start Date: February 10, 2001
End Date: February 16, 2001
Funding Number(s)
OTHER: CDDF-97-08
CONTRACT_GRANT: NAS8-00110
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

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