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Record Details

Record 18 of 5232
Flight Performance Evaluation of Three GPS Receivers for Sounding Rocket Tracking
Author and Affiliation:
Bull, Barton(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD United States)
Diehl, James(Litton PRC, Inc., Greenbelt, MD United States)
Montenbruck, Oliver(Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Wessling, Germany)
Markgraf, Markus(Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Wessling, Germany)
Bauer, Frank [Technical Monitor]
Abstract: In preparation for the European Space Agency Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange,, near Kiruna, Sweden on February 19, 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. The receivers included an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver, a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver and a Mitel Orion receiver. All of them provide CIA code tracking on the L1 frequency to determine the user position and make use of Doppler measurements to derive the instantaneous velocity. Among the receivers, the G12 has been optimized for use under highly dynamic conditions and has earlier been flown successfully on NASA sounding rockets [Bull, ION-GPS-2000]. The Allstar is representative of common single frequency receivers for terrestrial applications and received no particular modification, except for the disabling of the common altitude and velocity constraints that would otherwise inhibit its use for space application. The Orion receiver, finally, employs the same Mitel chipset as the Allstar, but has received various firmware modifications by DLR to safeguard it against signal losses and improve its tracking performance [Montenbruck et al., ION-GPS-2000]. While the two NASA receivers were driven by a common wrap-around antenna, the DLR experiment made use of a switchable antenna system comprising a helical antenna in the tip of the rocket and two blade antennas attached to the body of the vehicle. During the boost a peak acceleration of roughly 17g's was achieved which resulted in a velocity of about 1100 m/s at the end of the burn. At apogee, the rocket reached a maximum altitude of over 80 km. A detailed analysis of the attained flight data will be given in the paper together with a evaluation of different receiver designs and antenna concepts.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2001
Document ID:
20020020446
(Acquired Feb 15, 2002)
Subject Category: AIRCRAFT COMMUNICATIONS AND NAVIGATION
Document Type: Preprint
Meeting Information: ION National Technical Meeting; 28-30 Jan. 2002; San Diego, CA; United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD United States
Organization Source: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: FLIGHT TESTS; GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM; RECEIVERS; SOUNDING ROCKETS; SPACE MISSIONS; ANTENNA DESIGN; APOGEES; DATA REDUCTION; FREQUENCIES; HELICAL ANTENNAS; PAYLOADS
Availability Source: Other Sources
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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