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Record 1 of 1
Lessons Learned from Real-Time, Event-Based Internet Science Communications
Author and Affiliation:
Phillips, T.
Myszka, E.
Gallagher, D. L.
Adams, M. L.
Koczor, R. J.
Whitaker, Ann F. [Technical Monitor]
Abstract: For the last several years the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center has carried out a diverse program of Internet-based science communication. The Directorate's Science Roundtable includes active researchers, NASA public relations, educators, and administrators. The Science@NASA award-winning family of Web sites features science, mathematics, and space news. The program includes extended stories about NASA science, a curriculum resource for teachers tied to national education standards, on-line activities for students, and webcasts of real-time events. The focus of sharing science activities in real-time has been to involve and excite students and the public about science. Events have involved meteor showers, solar eclipses, natural very low frequency radio emissions, and amateur balloon flights. In some cases, broadcasts accommodate active feedback and questions from Internet participants. Through these projects a pattern has emerged in the level of interest or popularity with the public. The pattern differentiates projects that include science from those that do not, All real-time, event-based Internet activities have captured public interest at a level not achieved through science stories or educator resource material exclusively. The worst event-based activity attracted more interest than the best written science story. One truly rewarding lesson learned through these projects is that the public recognizes the importance and excitement of being part of scientific discovery. Flying a camera to 100,000 feet altitude isn't as interesting to the public as searching for viable life-forms at these oxygen-poor altitudes. The details of these real-time, event-based projects and lessons learned will be discussed.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2001
Document ID:
20020022514
(Acquired Mar 01, 2002)
Subject Category: SOCIAL AND INFORMATION SCIENCES (GENERAL)
Document Type: Preprint
Meeting Information: Office of Space Science Education/Outreach Conference; 12-14 Sep. 2001; Chicago, IL; United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL United States
Organization Source: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: WEBSITES; ON-LINE SYSTEMS; EDUCATION; REAL TIME OPERATION; NASA PROGRAMS; METEOROID SHOWERS; SOLAR ECLIPSES; RESONANT FREQUENCIES; BALLOON FLIGHT
Availability Source: Other Sources
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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