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Record Details

Record 41 of 4154
Studies of Gas-Particle Interactions in a Microgravity Flow Cell
Offline Availability: Go to Request Form
Author and Affiliation:
Louge, Michel Y.(Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY United States)
Jenkins, James T.(Cornell Univ., Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Ithaca, NY United States)
Abstract: The ability to transport particulate materials predictably and efficiently using a flowing gas is likely to play an important role in the development of lunar and Martian environments that are hospitable to humans. Lunar soil contains significant amounts of oxygen, hydrogen and other critical materials that are chemically bound in various minerals. Through appropriate processing, these resources may be recovered for use in propulsion, life support systems and mining operations. Similarly, it is believed that Martian soil contains significant amounts of water which can be electrolyzed into oxygen and hydrogen, again for propellants and life support. The transport of such granular soils from where they are mined and between stages of their processing is likely to involve pneumatic transport carried out in systems of pipes using flows of the liberated gases. On earth, the transport and processing of solid materials are also crucial in a number of applications from the chemical, mining, power and oil industries. For these flows, an appreciation has recently developed for the influence of collisional interactions among particles, both in suspensions where the flow is laminar and turbulent. Collisions between such particles can transfer a significant amount of momentum within the flow and at the boundaries. This provides an additional resistance to the passage of the gas, but it also introduces a mechanism that promotes more homogeneous flows and, at least in small-diameter pipes, may forestall the development of clusters.
Publication Date: Mar 01, 2002
Document ID:
20020039788
(Acquired Apr 26, 2002)
Subject Category: FLUID MECHANICS AND THERMODYNAMICS
Coverage: Final Report
Document Type: Technical Report
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NAG3-2112
Financial Sponsor: NASA Glenn Research Center; Cleveland, OH United States
Organization Source: Cornell Univ.; Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Ithaca, NY United States
Description: 104p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: GAS FLOW; PARTICULATES; MICROGRAVITY; LUNAR ENVIRONMENT; MARS SURFACE; LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS; CHEMICAL BONDS; PROPULSION SYSTEM PERFORMANCE; PROPULSION SYSTEM CONFIGURATIONS; SOILS; MINERALS; HYDROGEN
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