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sulfuric acid and soot particles in aircraft exhaustAircraft have become the fastest, fairly convenient and, in most cases of long-distance travel, most economical mode of travel. This is reflected in the increase of commercial air traffic at a rate of 6% per year since 1978. Future annual growth rates of passenger miles of 4% for domestic and 6% for international routes are projected. A still larger annual increase of 8.5% is expected for the Asia/Pacific region. To meet that growth, Boeing predicts the addition of 15,900 new aircraft to the world's fleets, valued at more than $1.1 trillion, within the next 20 years. The largest concern of environmental consequences of aircraft emissions deals with ozone (O3), because: (1) the O3 layer protects the blaspheme from short-ultraviolet radiation that can cause damage to human, animal and plant life, and possibly affect agricultural production and the marine food chain; (2) O3 is important for the production of the hydroxyl radical (OH) which, in turn, is responsible for the destruction of other greenhouse gases, e.g., methane (CH4) and for the removal of other pollutants, and (3) O3 is a greenhouse gas. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.
Document ID
20020046959
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Pueschel, Rudolf F.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA United States)
Verma, S.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA United States)
Ferry, G. V.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA United States)
Goodman, J.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA United States)
Strawa, A. W.
(NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA United States)
Gore, Warren J. Y.
Date Acquired
August 20, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 1997
Subject Category
Environment Pollution
Meeting Information
1997 Conference on the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation(Virginia Beach, VA)
Funding Number(s)
PROJECT: RTOP 146-10-04
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.