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NASA Imaging for Safety, Science, and HistorySince its creation in 1958 NASA has been making and documenting history, both on Earth and in space. To complete its missions NASA has long relied on still and motion imagery to document spacecraft performance, see what can't be seen by the naked eye, and enhance the safety of astronauts and expensive equipment. Today, NASA is working to take advantage of new digital imagery technologies and techniques to make its missions more safe and efficient. An HDTV camera was on-board the International Space Station from early August, to mid-December, 2001. HDTV cameras previously flown have had degradation in the CCD during the short duration of a Space Shuttle flight. Initial performance assessment of the CCD during the first-ever long duration space flight of a HDTV camera and earlier flights is discussed. Recent Space Shuttle launches have been documented with HDTV cameras and new long lenses giving clarity never before seen with video. Examples and comparisons will be illustrated between HD, highspeed film, and analog video of these launches and other NASA tests. Other uses of HDTV where image quality is of crucial importance will also be featured.
Document ID
20020048447
Document Type
Preprint (Draft being sent to journal)
Authors
Grubbs, Rodney (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville, AL United States)
Lindblom, Walt (Computer Sciences Corp. Huntsville, AL United States)
Bowerman, Deborah S.
Date Acquired
August 20, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 2002
Subject Category
Communications and Radar
Meeting Information
Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers 36th Advanced Motion Imaging Conference(Dallas, TX)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.
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